Abstract

We report on a concept of a fiber MOPA based quasi-CW laser working at high modulation bandwidths up to 40 MHz capable of producing arbitrary pulse durations at arbitrary repetition rates. An output power of over 100 W was achieved and an on-off contrast of 25 dB. The laser features a dual-channel (dual-wavelength) seed source, a double stage YDF amplifier and a volume-Bragg-grating-based signal de-multiplexer. Minimization of transients was conducted through experiment and model analysis.

© 2015 Optical Society of America

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References

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  1. C. Bollig, P.-G. Hofmeister, M. Kunze, J. Schmidt, S. Fayed, and R. Reuter, “Efficient single-frequency pulsed all-fibre amplifier for coherent lidar,” in 2013 Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics- International Quantum Electronics Conference, (Optical Society of America, 2013), paper CJ_P_31.
    [Crossref]
  2. P. Elahi, S. Yılmaz, Y. B. Eldeniz, and F. Ö. Ilday, “Generation of picosecond pulses directly from a 100 W, burst-mode, doping-managed Yb-doped fiber amplifier,” Opt. Lett. 39(2), 236–239 (2014).
    [Crossref] [PubMed]
  3. J. Petelin, B. Podobnik, and R. Petkovšek, “Burst shaping in a fiber-amplifier chain seeded by a gain-switched laser diode,” Appl. Opt. 54(15), 4629–4634 (2015).
    [Crossref] [PubMed]
  4. C. Larsen, K. P. Hansen, K. E. Mattsson, and O. Bang, “The all-fiber cladding-pumped Yb-doped gain-switched laser,” Opt. Express 22(2), 1490–1499 (2014).
    [Crossref] [PubMed]
  5. A. Starodoumov, L. R. M. Snadden, and A. Diening, “Fiber-mopa apparatus for delivering pulses on demand,” United States Patent US20120320450 (December 20, 2012).
  6. Q. Mao and J. W. Y. Lit, “Transient response of wavelength-switchable Erbium-doped fiber lasers with linear coupled cavities,” Microw. Opt. Technol. Lett. 35(4), 330–333 (2002).
    [Crossref]
  7. M. J. Munroe, “Method and apparatus for producing arbitrary pulsetrains from a harmonic fiber laser,” United States Patent US7885298 (February 8, 2011).
  8. A. Tuennermann, H. Zellmer, and J. P. Ruske, “Directly modulatable laser,” United States Patent US 20010014107 (August 16, 2001).
  9. R. Petkovšek and V. Agrež, “Single stage Yb-doped fiber laser based on gain switching with short pulse duration,” Opt. Express 22(2), 1366–1371 (2014).
    [Crossref] [PubMed]
  10. V. Agrež and R. Petkovšek, “Gain-switched Yb-doped fiber laser for microprocessing,” Appl. Opt. 52(13), 3066–3072 (2013).
    [Crossref] [PubMed]

2015 (1)

2014 (3)

2013 (1)

2002 (1)

Q. Mao and J. W. Y. Lit, “Transient response of wavelength-switchable Erbium-doped fiber lasers with linear coupled cavities,” Microw. Opt. Technol. Lett. 35(4), 330–333 (2002).
[Crossref]

Agrež, V.

Bang, O.

Elahi, P.

Eldeniz, Y. B.

Hansen, K. P.

Ilday, F. Ö.

Larsen, C.

Lit, J. W. Y.

Q. Mao and J. W. Y. Lit, “Transient response of wavelength-switchable Erbium-doped fiber lasers with linear coupled cavities,” Microw. Opt. Technol. Lett. 35(4), 330–333 (2002).
[Crossref]

Mao, Q.

Q. Mao and J. W. Y. Lit, “Transient response of wavelength-switchable Erbium-doped fiber lasers with linear coupled cavities,” Microw. Opt. Technol. Lett. 35(4), 330–333 (2002).
[Crossref]

Mattsson, K. E.

Petelin, J.

Petkovšek, R.

Podobnik, B.

Yilmaz, S.

Appl. Opt. (2)

Microw. Opt. Technol. Lett. (1)

Q. Mao and J. W. Y. Lit, “Transient response of wavelength-switchable Erbium-doped fiber lasers with linear coupled cavities,” Microw. Opt. Technol. Lett. 35(4), 330–333 (2002).
[Crossref]

Opt. Express (2)

Opt. Lett. (1)

Other (4)

C. Bollig, P.-G. Hofmeister, M. Kunze, J. Schmidt, S. Fayed, and R. Reuter, “Efficient single-frequency pulsed all-fibre amplifier for coherent lidar,” in 2013 Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics- International Quantum Electronics Conference, (Optical Society of America, 2013), paper CJ_P_31.
[Crossref]

A. Starodoumov, L. R. M. Snadden, and A. Diening, “Fiber-mopa apparatus for delivering pulses on demand,” United States Patent US20120320450 (December 20, 2012).

M. J. Munroe, “Method and apparatus for producing arbitrary pulsetrains from a harmonic fiber laser,” United States Patent US7885298 (February 8, 2011).

A. Tuennermann, H. Zellmer, and J. P. Ruske, “Directly modulatable laser,” United States Patent US 20010014107 (August 16, 2001).

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Figures (5)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1 Experimental setup. The VBG is Volume Bragg Grating used for filtering idler and signal.
Fig. 2
Fig. 2 Schematics (a) of a modeled problem showing stimulated processes in i-th segment together with low laser level energies. The calculation was done for 100 segments. The cross sections for wavelengths over 1µm are shown on (b).
Fig. 3
Fig. 3 Comparison (a) of the model with the measurement made for 40us pulse train of interchanging signal and idler from single amplifier. The upper laser level population is shown in (b).
Fig. 4
Fig. 4 A contour plot of the amplifier response. The power of the idler component and the first stage pumping power were kept constant at their maximum available levels of Ps2 = 45mW and Pp1 = 18W. (a) - relative overshot in the amplified response to the test bitstream; (b) - relative undershot in the amplified response to the test bitstream; (c) – min-to-max relative difference
Fig. 5
Fig. 5 Normalized output power. (a) – Amplified response at (Ps1 = 45mW, Pout = 73W), where global minimum of MMRD is reached; (b) – Amplified response at (Ps1 = 70mW, Pout = 73W)

Equations (2)

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N ˙ i = Γc V i k=1 3 σ k ( S k,i + + S k,i )( N i N k tr ) N i τ 21 + w i ,
S ˙ k,i ± = Γc V i σ k S k,i ± ( N i N k tr ) S k,i ± τ c + S k,i1 ± τ c + β 2 N i τ 21 .

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